Frequently asked Questions(FAQS)

Q: The GREENGUARD Environmental Institute

A: The GREENGUARD Environmental Institute aims to protect human health and improve quality of life by enhancing indoor air quality and reducing people’s exposure to chemicals and other pollutants. As an ISO-IEC Guide 65:1996 accredited, third-party organization, the GREENGUARD Environmental Institute (GEI) certifies products and materials for low chemical emissions and provides a resource for choosing healthier products and materials for indoor environments. All certified products must meet stringent chemical emissions standards based on established criteria from key public health agencies. GREENGUARD Certification is broadly recognized and accepted by sustainable building programs and building codes worldwide. www.greenguard.org

Q: The GREENGUARD Environmental Institute

A: “VOC” stands for Volatile Organic Compound. Organic compound refers to anything that contains carbon – living or not. Volatile is the term used to describe the compounds that evaporate readily at room temperature. This volatility, in itself, isn’t a problem but many VOCs are toxic and in turn cause health and air quality issues when they are released into the atmosphere. Part of the confusion surrounding VOCs is that they were initially regulated to control smog. ....

Q: VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS

A: “VOC” stands for Volatile Organic Compound. Organic compound refers to anything that contains carbon – living or not. Volatile is the term used to describe the compounds that evaporate readily at room temperature. This volatility, in itself, isn’t a problem but many VOCs are toxic and in turn cause health and air quality issues when they are released into the atmosphere. Part of the confusion surrounding VOCs is that they were initially regulated to control smog. Some VOCs (but not all) react with chlorine and nitrous oxides to form smog creating compounds and in turn, governments (particularly in California) banned them. This led to a public perception that all VOCs are bad (not true) and that products that are free of VOCs are safe (also not true). For example, ammonia and acetone have not been labeled as VOCs in the US because they don’t contribute to smog but are actually very toxic. Incredibly, they have also made their way into the “zero-VOC” formulations of major paint companies. Meanwhile, VOCs such as propylene glycol and natural aromatherapy oils are not considered hazardous but have negative connotations to the public because of their VOC label.

Q: Green Seal (YOLO)

A: Green Seal is an independent non-profit organization dedicated to safeguarding the environment and transforming the marketplace by promoting the manufacture, purchase, and use of environmentally responsible products and services. Green Seal works with manufacturers, industry sectors, purchasing groups and governments at all levels to "green" the production and purchasing chain. Utilizing a life-cycle approach, Green Seal evaluates a product or service beginning with material extraction, continuing with manufacturing and use, and ending with recycling and disposal. Products only become Green Seal certified after rigorous testing and evaluation, including on-site plant visits. A Green Seal certification says that a product or service has been tested according to science-based procedures, that it works as well or better than others in its class, and that it has been evaluated without bias or conflict of interest. This gives manufacturers the assurance to back up their claims and purchasers confidence that certified products are better for human health and the environment. The Green "Seal of Approval" has come to stand for reliability, fairness, and integrity. For more information check out www.greenseal.org

Q: MPI- Extreme Green Certification (Mythic)

A: MPI is an independent agency dedicated to the establishment of quality standards and quality assurance in the architectural painting and coating application industries. To the professional, MPI provides the assurance that approved products have passed rigorous, third-party performance tests and that they are able to be specified for various types of jobs, depending on their approval category. The MPI approval also allows Mythic Paint products to be easily substituted for other job specified brands based on similar performance criteria.

External Links

Green Seal

Green Seal is a nonprofit organization that develops life cycle-based sustainability standards for products, services and companies, and offers third-party certification for those that meet the criteria in the standard. Green Seal has been actively identifying and promoting sustainability in the marketplace, and helping organizations be greener in a real and effective way since 1989.

Lighthouse Sustainable Building Center

Lighthouse sustainable building center is an enterprising nonprofit society dedicated to advancing and catalyzing sustainability in British Columbia’s built environment. They offer a range of programs and services, including project visioning, green building documentation, market research, and custom training.

Canada Green Building Council

Canada green building council is a nonprofit, national accreditation body for the LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) building code and certification program. They work to change industry standards, develop best design practices and guidelines, advocate for green buildings, and develop educational tools to support members in implementing sustainable practices.

US Green Building Council

US Green Building Council is a nonprofit organization that supports sustainable market transformation through its LEED green building certification program, robust educational offerings, a nationwide network of chapters and affiliates, the annual Greenbuild International Conference & Expo, and advocacy in support of public policy that encourages and enables green buildings and communities.

Cascadia Green Building Council

Cascadia green building council is one of three original chapters of the U.S. Green Building Council and, as a chapter of the Canada Green Building Council as well, is the only international chapter in North America. The chapter covers Oregon, Washington, British Columbia and Alaska, but also includes members from as far away as Idaho and Montana. Cascadia continues to serve its members by helping the U.S. and Canada Green Building Councils meet their goals in the Pacific Northwest. We ......